Willow Tex’s newest faux leather product offering for the aviation sector, IZIT XRT has completed participation in a series of performance tests conducted on behalf of a major US airline by the University of Cincinnati’s Leather Research Lab. The company, a North Carolina-based manufacturer of IZIT Leather, noted that IZIT XRT’s cumulative scores across all manner of physical performance criteria earned “very high marks and finished at the top of the class, which is particularly impressive given its low weight of 10.6 ounces per square yard (360gsm)”.

    Of particular interest is IZIT XRT’s performance in metal corrosion testing per ASTM D1611. Of the six synthetic leathers evaluated, IZIT XRT was the only material that exhibited no corrosion and no discolouration of the three aluminium control strips and the seat control button hardware involved in the test, according to the manufacturer. “This gives the operator total peace of mind that their seat covers will never be the source of corrosion that could affect the structural integrity of the seat frame”, commented company spokesman Robin Butler.

    Willow Tex’s state-of-the-art manufacturing facility offers the capability of producing IZIT XRT for aviation seating, as well as other faux leathers used in contract furnishings, rail car seating and outdoor seating applications. “The customer has an infinite array of colour options to choose as well as numerous grain patterns. IZIT is available with a permanent anti-microbial finish and the product is quite simple to clean on-wing”, remarked Butler.

    He added: “With its superior physical performance coupled with a low weight and non-corrosive characteristics, IZIT Leather XRT moves to the head of the class among aviation and surface transportation surface solutions.”

    IZIT Leather is distributed to the aviation market by Spectra Interior Products of Winston-Salem, again based in the US state of North Carolina.

    When it comes to materials for aircraft interiors, lots of new materials are coming to the fore. In this article from our archives, Aviation Business News explores how and why companies are replacing traditional textiles and leather in aircraft cabins with re-engineered high-performance materials to improve the passenger experience.