The process of managing stranded passengers can be made simple and stress-free for airlines, as Get-e’s commercial director Roy Hughes explains

Flying is often the most convenient way to travel, whether it’s to visit relatives and friends abroad or jetting off to exotic holiday destinations. However, with flying always comes the risk of delays. Whether it’s due to staff shortages, severe weather disruptions or mechanical issues, airlines are used to having to deal with several hundred displaced travellers. But what happens if the delay results in a missed connection for just one person, or only a handful of passengers are left stranded?

Managing airline reputation

Get-e’s commercial director Roy Hughes

Disruption management solutions can be incredibly efficient for an aircraft full of passengers. However, an equally effective solution needs to be offered to solo or a small group of travellers. Airlines have the same obligation to provide passenger care to those who have been affected by flight disruptions regardless of the number of people involved. Although providing transport and accommodation may be costly for a single passenger, it is crucial for the airline’s reputation that they uphold the same quality of customer care.

In a scenario where a small number of passengers require assistance, providing vetted and trackable transport at short notice can demonstrate an airline’s willingness to go the extra mile for its customers – an action that will often set them apart from competitors. But how can airlines offer this support without creating vast amounts of administration and additional costs?

Using a reputable ground transportation company with a wide network of destinations is key. For example, Get-e is able to offer market expertise, high quality and effective ground transportation services in more than 110 countries and 900 destinations which allows airlines to streamline their operations and focus on what they do best.

Recognising that one size does not fit all when it comes to the services required by airlines is fundamental to meeting the needs of passengers. Allowing a trusted operator to safely manage the transfer of passengers with alternative transport or accommodation can have a huge impact on passenger satisfaction and trust, both of equal importance for a carrier.

Use of technology

In addition to managing alternative transfers for stranded passengers, communication throughout the process is vital. It removes some of the stress from the situation and allows passengers to focus on their journey ahead.

Get-e offers a mobile app, and Hughes notes that much can be achieved with the right technology in place

Good transportation companies will be able to use technology to send passengers automatic notifications about their transfers which is another step in helping airlines go the extra mile. With the right technology in place, plans can even be executed whilst the aircraft is still in the air. This means passengers are updated as to what their alternative travel arrangements are before they have a chance to be stressed about the situation. This will help keep passengers calm, and in turn, will improve their travelling experience and increase their loyalty to the airline.

Through transporting stranded passengers, carriers ensure that not only are regulatory standards met, but customer satisfaction is increased. By going the extra mile through increased communication and giving customers instant oversight of journey, airlines can significantly improve their reputation and showcase their brand values even during disruption.

To find out more about Get-e’s crew transfer or disruption management platform, visit www.get-e.com, call +44 203 856 8655 or email [email protected]

About the author

Roy Hughes became the commercial director of Get-e in 2019. Prior to joining the company, Roy gained experience in the business travel industry, working directly with airlines before moving into the ground transport sector. His current role at Get-e is focused on business growth, commercial contracting and key account management.

He holds a Bachelor’s degree in international relations from Keele University and a Master’s in comparative government from The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).

 

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